The Monochrome of War

“The Monochrome of War” was my invited guest column on Snob, a journal and media project published in Russian. Because articles on Snob can expire after a certain time, the full text is also reproduced below.

Efim, Emil, and Eksi

There was a man in the Kharkiv of my childhood. He lived very centrally, somewhere in the numerous green courtyards right off the city’s main square (if I remember correctly). His name sounded like sand on a windy beach: Efim Isaakovich.

On being a Snob

Meanwhile, an offer to post a piece on Snob has arrived, and was gladly accepted — because a text has been in the making all this time, while I processed the postdoc year spent in Russia. That processing is still not over (will it ever be quite over?), but some contemplations did take shape.

In Russian.

In Germany

Now, I take up the 2015 Einstein Fellowship at the Einstein Forum in Potsdam, Germany — with a rather personal (and rather mysterious) research project I will soon blog about.

Russian Sketch 3

One of the security guards in our building, Leonid, a lively and kindly man of Armenian descent in his late sixties, spent this whole year languishing in his desire to talk Ukrainian politics.

What does Ukraine think?

“Beyond Pro and Anti: Monochrome Prefixes and Their Discontents” — my thoughts on the spiral of silence, the inverse echo chamber, and wartime’s semantic chameleons, in “What does Ukraine think?” collection from the European Council on Foreign Relations (ed. by Andrew Wilson).